Throwback Thursday – Dream Country (Vol 3) by Neil Gaiman

Dream Country (Vol. 3)
By: Neil Gaiman (writer)
Release Date: (Original release) 1991; (this volume) October 19, 2010
Publisher: Vertigo
Series: The Sandman #3
Award: World Fantasy Award for Short Story (“A Midsummer Night’s Dream); Harvey Awards Nominee for Best Graphic Album of Previously Published Material (1992); Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards for Best Continuing Series, Best Writer (for Neil Gaiman) (1991)
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Happy Throwback Thursday, everyone. This week I continued reading The Sandman series, written by Neil Gaiman. This is an excellent horror graphic novel series, perfect to read around Halloween that everyone should read.

For anyone unfamiliar with the series, or if you’d like to catch up on our reviews, check out the reviews of Preludes and Nocturns (Volume 1) and The Doll’s House (Volume 2).

Dream Country (Volume 3) of the The Sandman series reads more like a compilation of short stories as opposed to the previous volumes in the series. The volume is separated into three different stories. One is about a Here again Dream takes somewhat of a back seat. Dream’s presence is obvious, and very much felt in each tale. Yet, he is not necessarily the main character of each tale. He is the catalyst, the important factor, the other, at times.

New Release – It Devours! by Joseph Fink and Jeffrey Cranor

It Devours!
By: Joseph Fink; Jeffrey Cranor
Website: http://www.welcometonightvale.com/
Release Date: October 17, 2017
Publisher: Harper Collins
Series: Night Vale #2
Received From: Publisher
(All reviews are our own, honest opinions.)
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The latest inclusion in the Welcome to Night Vale universe is the second novel, It Devours! by Joseph Fink and Jeffrey Cranor. This follows last year’s novel titled simply as Welcome to Night Vale. It Devours! is a thriller-esque tale set in the town of Night Vale, a small place somewhere in the mid-west where every conspiracy theory is true, monsters are real, the rules of time-space are more like guidelines, and the citizens take everything in stride, as if it were all the most normal thing in the world.

Throwback Thursday – The Doll’s House by Neil Gaiman

The Doll's House
By: Neil Gaiman
Release Date: 1995
Publisher: Vertigo
Series: The Sandman #2
Award: Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards for Best Continuing Series; Best Graphic Album - Reprint; Best Writer (Neil Gaiman)
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The Sandman series is a long running graphic novel series written by Neil Gaiman featuring the immortal Dream and his struggle to rise to full power once again after a long imprisonment at the hands of humans. The Doll’s House is the second volume within the series, a dark story with memorable characters that feels more refined and bears more visible characteristics of Neil Gaiman’s work that the first volume of the series.

Review – Carnivalesque by Neil Jordan

Carnivalesque
By: Neil Jordan
Release Date: June 6, 2017
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
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Carnivalesque by Neil Jordan is a story about a boy named Andy who finds himself sucked through a mirror in a carnival’s house of mirrors. His reflection enters the real world and goes home with his parents, leaving Andy stuck and alone on the other side of the glass. He is not alone here, for this is the world of the Carnies, the carnival people, a place where magic is real. Meanwhile Andy’s mother watches the Not-Andy living with her family, wondering if this is merely Andy growing up or if this is something else, something more sinister.

Review: Attack On Titan, Vol. 1 by Hajime Isayama

Attack on Titan, Vol. 1
By: Hajime Isayama
Release Date: (English Translation) June 19, 2012
Publisher: Kodansha Comics
Series: Attack on Titan #1
Award: Kodansha Manga Award for Best Shounen Manga (2011), 『エンタミクス』NEXTブレイク漫画ランキング BEST50 for 2nd place (当時1巻) (2010)
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This isn’t the first time I’ve read Attack on Titan Vol. 1 by Hajime Isayama. The first time was quite some time ago, right around when the English version was released. This time was because I’d picked up a used copies of the first two volumes in the series at a used book sale. But this is the first time I’ve read the manga with a more critical eye.

Review: Fragments of Horror by Junji Ito

Fragments of Horror
By: Junji Ito
Release Date: (Original Japanese) July 8, 2014; (English) June 16, 2015
Publisher: VIZ Media
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This book has been sitting on my shelf for quite some time. Unlike the majority of the small library my husband and I have acquired, this one is his! Fragments of Horror is a manga filled with short, one chapter stories by Junji Ito, author of longer works such as Tomie. Ito is a master of horror, each story filled with strange, bizarre happenings and art that is as beautiful as it is terrifying.

Review: Horrorstör by Grady Hendrix

Horrorstör
By: Grady Hendrix
Website: http://www.gradyhendrix.com/
Release Date: September 23, 2014
Publisher: Quirk
Award: Goodreads Choice Nominee for Horror (2014)
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The more I think about it, the more I like this book. Horrorstör by Grady Hendrix is a traditional haunted house story turned on its head. Familiar themes are explored, changed, and discarded while remaining happily familiar and easily readable.

Review: Damned

Damned
By: Chuck Palahniuk
Website: http://chuckpalahniuk.net/
Release Date: October 18th, 2011
Publisher: Doubleday Canada
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When you think of Chuck Palahniuk I’m sure most people think of perhaps his most well known work, Fight Club, which I understand, given how well written it is and what a hit the move became. But, let’s look at another work of his that is just as sharp and witty to read as Fight Club. I might not have loved it as much, and it seems many fans agree, but still the book is worth the read if you can get into it.

Throwback Thursday: The Sandman, Vol. 1: Preludes and Nocturns by Neil Gaiman

The Sandman, Vol. 1: Preludes and Nocturns
By: Neil Gaiman
Website: http://www.neilgaiman.com/
Release Date: (Original) 1988; (this edition) December 1, 1988
Publisher: Vertigo
Series: The Sandman #1
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I was in the used book store attached to my library recently, seeing what new things they’d put on the shelves since the last time I wiped out their stock. Out of curiosity I wandered over to a shelf labeled ‘humor’. There, tucked between copies of newspaper comic strip compilations and stand up comic’s autobiographies was a misplaced copy of Neil Gaiman’s Sandman: Preludes and Nocturns.

A ‘humor’ book this is not. But if you’re looking for some graphic novel horror in your life, you’ve come to the right place.