Review – Ararat by Christopher Golden

By: Christopher Golden
Release Date: April 17, 2017
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
Award: Bram Stoker Award for Best Novel (2017)

Sometimes a book lands on the to read list and sits there. Despite passing by Ararat each time I went to the library I didn’t borrow it. There was always a different book I’d come in for, or my stack was already piled four or five books high. However, this time was different. I finally read Ararat by Christopher Golden.

Review – Gunpowder Moon by David Pedreira

Gunpowder Moon
By: David Pedreira
Release Date: February 13, 2018
Publisher: Harper Voyager
Received From: Publisher
(All reviews are our own, honest opinions.)

You’d never be able to tell from the theme of this blog, but I really love a good mystery story. When I learned about the murder mystery on the plot of Gunpowder Moon I was instantly intrigued. Gunpowder Moon by David Pedreira is a murder mystery steeped with politics and whose implications that could lead to war.

Review – Universal Harvester by John Darnelle

Universal Harvester
By: John Darnelle
Release Date: February 7, 2017
Publisher: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux

I was intrigued by the synopsis of this book, despite hearing some mixed opinions. Universal Harvester by John Darnelle is a mysterious tale, one that evokes a sense of horror in early chapters, but ultimately winds up pittering out with too many characters and an ever shifting point of view.

Review – Glass Town by Steven Savile

Glass Town
By: Steven Savile
Release Date: December 5, 2017
Publisher: Thomas Dunne Books

During my last trip to the library a recent release I’d not heard much about caught my eye. Glass Town by Steven Savile is a novel that combines traditional noir mystery, the glamour of 1920s filmmaking, and fantasy in wonderful harmony.

Review – Dreamland Burning by Jennifer Latham

Dreamland Burning
By: Jennifer Latham
Release Date: February 21, 2017
Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

It has been a long time since a book has struck me in the sort of way Dreamland Burning by Jennifer Latham struck me. It’s the sort of book that is devoured, read with the sort of all-consuming fervor that makes a person look up bewildered when the phone rings, or wondering when exactly the sun set. I loved this book. This book is important. It matters.

Review – The Novel of the Tumpinamba Indian by E. F. Granell

The Novel of the Tumpinamba Indian
By: E. F. Granell
Translator: David Coulter
Release Date: December 12, 2017
Publisher: City Lights Publishers

When I heard that a novel written by a surrealist artist was being published in English for the first time, I knew I needed to read it. I was fascinated, both by the subject matter and the writer. The Novel of the Tumpinamba Indian is a surrealist take on the Spanish Civil War and was written by E. F. Granell, artist and revolutionary.

Review – In Calabria by Peter S. Beagle

In Calabria
By: Peter S. Beagle
Release Date: February 14, 2017
Publisher: Tachyon Publications

Books steeped in myth and folktale are ones that I am always drawn to, so it is with no surprise that I found myself with a copy of In Calabria by Peter S. Beagle.

Claudio Bianchi needs no one, opting to remain on his farm with his animals and his poetry to the exclusion of everything and everyone else. But one day a unicorn that, if he isn’t mistaken, is about to give birth wanders onto his farm and calls it home. Suddenly entrusted with this magical appearance, he finds himself beset upon by those who want the unicorn for their own ends, some of whom refuse to take no as an answer.

Review – Autonomous by Annalee Newitz

By: Annalee Newitz
Release Date: September 19, 2017
Publisher: Tor Books

A book I had my eye on for some time was Autonomous by Annalee Newitz. This is a book about autonomy, what makes someone autonomous, and a race across the globe as an illegally distributed drug begins to rack up an unexpected death toll.

Autonomous is, in a lot of ways, very dystopian. Or it wanted to be. I can’t help but feel that everything wrapped up much too nicely to be considered dystopian. (In the traditional sense of the genre and not counting the Young Adult Dystopians that relate more closely to dark fantasy/sci-fi than to adult dystopian).

Review – Carnivalesque by Neil Jordan

By: Neil Jordan
Release Date: June 6, 2017
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA

Carnivalesque by Neil Jordan is a story about a boy named Andy who finds himself sucked through a mirror in a carnival’s house of mirrors. His reflection enters the real world and goes home with his parents, leaving Andy stuck and alone on the other side of the glass. He is not alone here, for this is the world of the Carnies, the carnival people, a place where magic is real. Meanwhile Andy’s mother watches the Not-Andy living with her family, wondering if this is merely Andy growing up or if this is something else, something more sinister.

Review: Horrorstör by Grady Hendrix

By: Grady Hendrix
Release Date: September 23, 2014
Publisher: Quirk
Award: Goodreads Choice Nominee for Horror (2014)

The more I think about it, the more I like this book. Horrorstör by Grady Hendrix is a traditional haunted house story turned on its head. Familiar themes are explored, changed, and discarded while remaining happily familiar and easily readable.